ThomasEgi

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ThomasEgi
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  • that's not how physics and engineering work. unfortunately.
  • A magnetic coating over your bones will do nothing. No stronger bones. No stronger/faster movement. No special powers. You might be able to put a fridge magnet with sticky notes in places where your bone is near the skin. Drawbacks: you get in troub…
  • ISO 7010 E003 (the white cross on green background as international standard for first aid) and the "Star of Life" (it probably is recognizeable by medical professionals). Starting from those add a few of the typical wifi lines. However I…
  • A related talk about the system you are up against. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_WlOc_Kzh8 Long story short you have 3 possible levels of difficulty: 1. pretty straight forward for all cars without imobilization system. That's for cars older th…
  • no new idea about magnets other than most coatings are crap. I'm not the right person to ask if something is safe. I can only tell you why some things are not obviously not safe.
  • producing the capsules isn't even the problem. Welding them together requires laser welding optimized for very thing materials. It does exist and there are specialist companies out there but I got no response from any of them. You should be prepared…
  • You have to put those things into perspective. You are concerned about your safety already, so your life, health and safety should be worth 60 bucks. A broken tag, glass fragments, infection, a loss of your limb or life is considerably more expensiv…
  • Guess it depends on how many of those 100 survive the usual testing procedures.
  • Just for fun I tried to search amazon for HUD glasses. There's quite some choice. Glasses with HUD integrated are pretty dense packed circuit boards with constraints on size, volume, weight and power demand/availability. It'd be pretty hard to build…
  • I'm by far not an expert. I just read up on stuff. Given the sparse amount of information on ePTFE it seems to be similar to regular PTFE with different mechanical properties. I found no information about the differences in coating application/proc…
  • You have to see the differences in application. having a solid block of material (like in most implants we talk about here) is usualy perfectly fine. If your application generates small particles (for example from joints under mechanical load) or l…
  • according to the handbook for biomedical engineering and design ( ISBN: 978-0-07-170473-1) PET undergoes very slow bioerosion. it does have reasonably good permeability to prevent moisture and oxygen (so it will most likely be unaffected by the salt…
  • there are more than 120 posts regarding supermagnetman magnets on this board. Many containing valuable information about magnets and coatings and what's good/bad etc. If you don't feel like reading it up here's the short story: no magnet is safe to …
  • I've worked with raw HDPE rods for welding before. Quite the interesting material which can be hot-melt but ultrasonic/friction/laser-welding works too. If you have two parts with different optical properties (for example one transparent in the IR-r…
  • i guess you could run an ftp server on an esp8266.
  • I'm not the ultimate magnet guide guy but there is a reason behind all those coatings. The Ni-Cu-Ni coating's job is to protect the magnet from moisture and oxygen. Even the smallest (read as in you won't even find that with a microscope) error/fai…
  • getting back to solid metal for a quick question. if the moisture creeps in through inperfect grain boundaries in thin coatings, how would changing metal thickness and grain size impact the barrier performance. like would bigger grains be preferable…
  • as a reminder. we need a moisture barrier here. means something that prevents h2o molecules do diffuse through. a monocristaline metal or diamond would be ideal. i don't know how graphene would hold up. it might be thin but i'd say it so thin that s…
  • @zerbula, yes polishing with diamond dust works but it literally takes monthes to wear down the surface even a tiny bit. it's pretty much the hardest thing you can do, sort of literally. the process i am aware of produces about palm-sized diamond di…
  • diamond sounds nice in theory. you can grow it using microwave heated gas to create a plasma. Temperature wise i'm not sure but that's not the issue with diamond. biggest problem is, you get a very rough polycrystaline diamond surface. this stuff …
  • https://www.ele.uri.edu/courses/bme181/S02/Tom_2.pdf (the stuff mentioned above) https://microprobes.com/files/pdf/publications/gen-knowledge/cogan_2008_neural_stimulation.pdf http://iopscience.iop.org/1741-2552/10/1/016007 https://freidok.uni-fr…
  • keep in mind the demagnetization is also geometry dependent. https://www.kjmagnetics.com/blog.asp?p=temperature-and-neodymium-magnets getting up to 160°C might be a bit tricky but with a more cylindrical shape rather than a disk you could get away …
  • Could you at least provide something remotely comparable to a scientific look at this mixture before asking for bitcoins? Correct me if I'm wrong but I see a lot of "might" and "maybe" claims but no hard data. Side effects? Risks…
  • metal platings are very different from a solid and flawless metal shell. if you can't make a plating perfect there is not much reason to do it in first place. a tiny flawed spot is enough to make the whole thing fail. given the past track records fi…
  • pmma has amongst the highest permeability ratings i know. meaning your magnet will be exposed to moisture and might start rusting/decomposing on the long run. PMMA would be an okay candidate to protect the body from the implant as it is reasonably b…
  • sensor magnets in the ears won't do too much. rfid-implant is pretty straight forward if you have someone to do it for you. If you do it yourself you'll have to prepare very well. more advanced stuff requires even more preparations
  • MRI's have been discussed in the past. For example: https://forum.biohack.me/index.php?p=/discussion/comment/26033
  • nickel is not bioproof/bioinert. Do NOT implant it. No matter how stressed your financial situation is, a visit in the ER won't help your finger or your financial situation. same goes for gold-coated magnets. while gold is somewhat inert the coatin…
  • in fact you can. The sensation is not as potent as with the implanted version but you can sense strong magnetic fields by using double sided tape and a small magnet. Or the good old glue trick.
  • yes. other than a lot of pain there isn't a lot to gain from switching the location to below-nail level. Mechanoreceptor density is highest near the skin, not below the nail afaik.