SixEcho

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SixEcho
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  • @ChrisBot it's been slow, we have had trouble with dev members not being available to work on the implant. between february and july i was back in australia and nothing got done at all. that being said, as of last week we have a fully functi…
  • @MTS - V2 does have blue LEDs! It'll be hard to see them though, skin blocks blue light really well. @ChilliEye - sort of. Maybe send an email to [email protected] if you're interested. Unfortunately our first production run was spoken for…
  • @gbit parylene is laid down by vacuum deposition. the silicone was cast and then machined into shape, but in future, will be injection molded. We made an agreement so I can't give you specifics, unfortunately, but a quick google will turn up many co…
  • @garethnelsonuk the implant runs off a CR2325 lithium coin cell, with a capacity of 190mAh. not much but it gets you tens of thousands of uses, several days of lights-on time. it is not rechargeable. @glims it's coated in 0.125mm parylene-c, under …
  • plenty of reasons, safety testing being the biggest one. if you are the first, it's even more important, because you want to set a good example.
  • you should add a magnetic shield between the coil and the rest of the device. otherwise you'll get all sorts of weird currents occurring in the battery and it'll go bad quickly. http://www.mouser.com/new/wurth-electronics/wurth-flexible-ferrite-shee…
  • been thinking about tiny cultured muscles to generate power for implants. say they squeeze a piezo generator or something. and some types of tissue might have a measurable response to glucose or other chemicals, which would make for a good continuou…
  • byron bay area, right up the top. @Rawin yeah that's exactly it, I started talking to @Lucas_Dimoveo a few days after they started. Didn't have a lot of experience back then but I learned on the job. We've been focused on this Northstar implant, w…
    in Australians Comment by SixEcho June 2015
  • Hi! I'm from northern NSW. It'd be great to meet up if there's anyone else in the area. I'm an engineer for Grindhouse Wetware, so I'm involved with designing and testing implant systems, and I have a little lab for circuit construction. I don't ha…
    in Australians Comment by SixEcho June 2015
  • I think I brought it up. I guess I should stop doing that before someone loses a limb. Well, if induction charging is the way to go, how can we improve on it? Currently my main issue with it is size. We should definitely try to source or make smal…
  • Grindhouse is doing a sonar module *externally*. Sonar modules aren't even that hard to wire up. The tricky part in your proposal is wiring it into the brain. I'm in, of course. I'm always in. But I am not willing to experiment on my own brain…
  • How the hell did we not think of that already? That actually sounds promising. I will put that on the experiment checklist too. You could easily make them small enough to implant. Don't know how the efficiency scales down, seems like heavier/longer …
  • I don't reckon PFTE would reject if you keep it really clean. The texture is pretty much integral here though. I think non-rejection was the point of the HA coat. You know, I still have a jar of that stuff, if you want to try anything with it. I w…
  • Eh, damn, I was hoping it would be that easy. How about braided mesh around an elastic core? Thinly braided so as to not waste space. @Bish Sorry, didn't see your post until mine refreshed the page. Nice solution, but dude, that's a lot of sur…
  • Yep. I held the wound closed and glued the opening shut. No point getting any inside because you want the inside to heal.You end up with a superglue cap over the wound. You might need to maintain it if it starts to break. Take it off after a couple …
  • In addition to all those points, it's worth pointing out that genes don't really work like that. Gene interactions can work like instructions to build something, sure (although we barely know how), but they do that mostly during development. You've …
  • Naw, I didn't. The structure seems to be more important than the materials used. (Don't quote me on that... I did this once, I can't be called an expert).Anyway, the transdermal section basically has something for the skin to bond to, and a flange u…
  • A google search for 'elastic wire' brings up a couple results. These are the top two: http://www.pandahall.com/beads/wholesale-Elastic-Wire/0-58-1.html and http://www.ebay.com/itm/NiTi-Nitinol-Nickel-Titanium-Super-Elastic-Wire-50-feet-/120476274177…
  • We could get the DIYbio guys to make some sort of plague.. Hey, I didn't know that Lucifer is our patron saint. That's fucking awesome.
  • http://www.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/glucose-fuel-cell-0612.html Haven't read much about dental implants, but they seem to work very well, especially given the load that teeth have to put up with. We should 'recruit' some dentists.
  • I wouldn't bother attaching it to the bone at all. That would hurt a lot. We probably won't get to that for a while, until we need load-bearing joins for prostheses and stuff. The important part of that ITAP link was how they constructed the transde…
  • BTW, sugru sucks. It lasts for about a year then gets soft and starts falling apart. If you don't want the implant to ever come out, use parylene C. If you want to be able to replace it, I would suggest teflon.
  • You'd have to keep it very flat to the surface, for example like those plugs in the matrix. Almost nothing should be above the skin surface besides the rim of the jack. Maybe use a TRS jack, or something home-made with fine pins if you need more tha…
  • You could pass a wire down the bore of a needle and just inject it. It would be hard to do up near your head, though, not to mention risky.Well, yeah, there is going to be surgery involved, what did you expect when you joined up here? :P Experimen…
  • If you want a transdermal jack for charging, I figured out how to do that a while ago, but nobody seemed to care. (Not that I can blame them. It could get nasty quite easily. But the volume it occupies is a tiny fraction of what an induction char…
  • Induction is currently the favoured method. GHWW is working on making it practical. Piezos have a pretty crappy current return, and you have to put them in spots that move around (not good for implants at all) but they don't need charging, which is …
  • Thomas's point still stands. The path of least resistance, given that the body is made of salty wet stuff, probably won't stay along the line of ink, especially with a heavy electrical load. Electric noise from the body would wreck data transmission…
  • It's all good. I let it slide and got stuck into other projects. Didn't think about doubling the coil up for both applications, that's a really good idea. You can get these battery management IC's from sparkfun that are like, the size of a rice gr…