Is this coating safe?

So I'm new to the biohacking scene, and have seen a few magnets that people tend to implant, but I found a guide someone made and they used a cylindrical magnet, which I feel would be easier since I can just use a surgical needle toake a tunnel instead of making a slit. The magnet posted isn't the exact one he used (N52) but it's the same site and size. I just want sure if a nickel coating is safe for an implant. I've seen people on the fourm use magnets from this site but I'm not sure exactly what kind. Another benefit of this one is it's dirt cheap, and as a teenager in highschool with a crappy job I'm very financially stressed. I'm assuming its more or less safe for implanting but I thought I would ask before ordering and attempting anything crazy. Any help is appreciated. Thanks!

Magnet- https://supermagnetman.com/products/cyl0040

Guide- http://silentvector33.blogspot.com/2017/06/my-self-installed-magnet-implant.html?m=1
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Comments

  • nickel is not bioproof/bioinert. Do NOT implant it. No matter how stressed your financial situation is, a visit in the ER won't help your finger or your financial situation.

    same goes for gold-coated magnets. while gold is somewhat inert the coating is faulty pretty much 100% of the time and over time, the magnet will fail.

    You need a real bioproof coating for implants. As for magnets the only reliable source would be Steve Haworth's magnets.

    Just as a reminder. A coating needs to be biocompatible. Means it does not cause problems to the body. It also needs to be bioinert , so the body won't start breaking it down over time. It also needs to protect the actual implant from the body (which is an agressive beast btw). In case of magnets the most difficult part is to keep any moisture/water away from the magnets. Even tiny amounts of water will cause the magnet to degrade and fall apart, so even a microscopic fault in the coating is enough to kickstart a reaction leading to the complete loss and disintegration of the magnet.

    Long story short: it's not quite as easy, especially not cheap. You have lot's of research to do.

  • Didn't there used to be something in the READ FIRST about this? There have been like 5 iterations of this thread in the last week..

    The next step will be attempts with cheap silicone..

    Then someone will be like wow, I got a quote to coat these in parylene...
    Lol.
  • Ok, glad i asked before ordering. How about this one? It's from that guy steve haworth, again im new to this so sorry if i sound like an idiot.

    https://store.stevehaworth.com/collections/magnets/products/silicone-encased-fingertip-magnet

    (scilicone coated)

  • @Patches33001 said:
    Ok, glad i asked before ordering. How about this one? It's from that guy steve haworth, again im new to this so sorry if i sound like an idiot.

    https://store.stevehaworth.com/collections/magnets/products/silicone-encased-fingertip-magnet

    (scilicone coated)

    If you don't know the basics of what the magnet should be coated in I would not even start to think about cutting open your finger/hand without doing lots of reading first. That being said the haworth magnets are some of if not the best magnets on the market. Since it is a good idea to wait a little bit and read up on them first I would wait and see how the new Sense52 TiN and Polymethylmethacrylate magnets work out for people. You may also want to look into the local laws about body mods of minors so there aren't any legal problems.

  • Yeah. I'm definitely not implying you're an idiot but I do agree that you should do a lot more research before doing a self implant. It's easy to get frustrated by repetitious questions about simple things.. It's your first time asking, but it's "our" collective thousandth time. One of the mores of this community though is safety. It's people who come in after using an exacto and sticking a kitchen magnet into their finger who get the "idiot" label. Welcome to the forums. Yes, Haworths magnets have a pretty good track record. If you want to learn more about the types of coatings that work well, check out the wiki and search through older threads.

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