The Lantern Implant

Hi guys! This is the new thread for the rechargeable phosphorescent implant I'm developing. I have decided to name it the lantern implant, just so we have something to call it.

Similar to the firefly tattoo, the lantern will glow through the skin where it is implanted. The difference comes with the use of europium glow powder instead of a tritium vial to produce the light. Unlike the firefly, the lantern will need to be charged by a light source such as a flashlight to emit light. Once charged, which takes a minute or so, the powder glows for about 30 minutes. It is very bright at first then slowly diminishes over time.

Here is an album of the first one I made, I may make them slightly shorter since they can contain so much powder in order to be even more robust. The glass is good name brand Corning borosilicate (Pyrex)

Currently I have not implanted one yet, I will test on myself as soon as I have some time off of work and I find the courage to do it.

I have talked to a vender about syringes and should be receiving a sample batch in the next month or two. It would be very easy for me to just make the implant itself and send it out unsterilized for traditional implantation, but it will take me some time to work out the sterilized package inside the syringe.

Let me know what you think!

Comments

  • That's funny. I just made one the other night. Yeah, these new pigments are amazingly bright aren't they?
  • I was playing at first with borosilicate tubing, but I've found a better method to be mixing the pigment with a resin. What you can do is is mix up the resin with the pigment and put it in a mold. After it hardens, you add an additional biocomp resin over that. This way you can create whatever design you want.
  • I didn't notice a link to the album on the first post here.

    https://imgur.com/a/vcyHt

    I look forward to see how these work when implanted. The resin idea sounds like a good idea too.

  • edited March 15

    I'd definitely buy a few if the implant trials are promising. Have any idea what the pricing on these would look like?

    Also, I love the aqua.

    @Cassox said:
    I was playing at first with borosilicate tubing, but I've found a better method to be mixing the pigment with a resin. What you can do is is mix up the resin with the pigment and put it in a mold. After it hardens, you add an additional biocomp resin over that. This way you can create whatever design you want.

    Do you think we could eventually 3D print molds for these and cheaply create custom glowing implants?

  • If you could somehow pair it with one of those rf powered led I would be in
  • I'm going to try them on magnets tomorrow. I doubt it will be enough to get an effect.
  • Judging by the glow on the tattoo I did with the powder, I would expect it to be visible in very dark locations. You will likely have to purposely charge it by holding a bright light (flashlight or black light) right against the implant. Even with the tattoo, which wouldn't be as deep as an actual implant, just normal room lighting isn't enough to charge it.

    The glass tubes and the magnet coating would probably have a lot more powder than I got in my skin and be closer together so hopefully the results are brighter and longer lasting. I look forward to hearing the test results.

    1. Riffing off of @Cassox 's idea, I wonder if the glow powder could be mixed into silicone or parylene to make a shaped, flexible glow in the dark implant. It would be brighter than the tattoo because you could add more powder, though perhaps not as bright as a similarly-sized Lantern, and it could be made into larger implants similar to Steve Haworth's shaped silicone implants.
    2. Are firefly tattoos bright enough to charge the europium powder? A firefly (or a few!) could be embedded in glow-powder-impregnated silicone to keep the glow powder charged, and to disperse the light from the firefly throughout the polymer.
    3. I don't know a lot about fiber optics, but based on my limited understanding, optical fibers could be suspended inside of silicone or parylene (assuming they're not biosafe on their own), and conduct light through an implant. That way, one could have a shaped implant that lights up at specific locations (e.g. christmas tree with lights), perhaps powered by a Firefly or Lantern.
  • @FireBreathingReptile said:
    2. Are firefly tattoos bright enough to charge the europium powder? A firefly (or a few!) could be embedded in glow-powder-impregnated silicone to keep the glow powder charged, and to disperse the light from the firefly throughout the polymer.

    The way glow-in-the-dark powders work is by storing energy and remitting it. You could charge it with a firefly, but the light coming out the powder would not be brighter than the light coming out of the firefly (in fact, there would be some loss) so this can't work. I suppose if you charged it with a flashlight first the addition of the firefly might make it last longer, but I doubt it would really make a significant difference.

  • edited August 28
    @Cassox what resin are you using for your testing and if possible do you have a link to buy it
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