Magnet getting weaker? Magnetize?

Hello i´m new in this Forum. My name is Matteo and i´m 21 years old.
Now I have a magnet implant in my ringfinger for over 3 years and i was wondering that it´s getting weaker and i cant even lift coins or bottle caps anymore and the sense is getting way waeker too. My question was if anyone of you experienced similar effects and if anyone tried to magnetize the magnet while it´s in your finger and if so how you did it?

Comments

  • What kind of magnet is it? There are quite a few accounts of people having magnets that grew weaker but otherwise were showing signs of nothing else. However, upon removal it was discovered that the coating on the magnet had failed and the magnet had begun to break down.
    I ask what magnet you have because some magnets have been shown to be more likely to fail over time. An example would be the m31s, which have a high failure rate. That is why they are not sold anymore.
    Neodymium magnets should maintain their strength for a MUCH longer time than 3 years. If it has indeed decreased in strength a significant amount, the coating may have failed and it may be corroding.
  • Same story with my M31, it doesn't appear to be problematic but it's just a chunk of slag in my finger at this point. Maybe I should stop being lazy and remove it to see if the coating is indeed breaking down.

  • Well I decided to just do it tonight after some liquor and iced finger. Yeah, it failed hard. Coating deteriorated in the middle, not as bad as some pictures I've seen but it must have been slow leaking so to speak for awhile. OP, I highly recommend you cut it out ASAP.

  • Thanks for your recommendation.
    Was your M31 magnet gold coated? Sounds quite dangerous if they have a high failure rate? I don´t know the name of mine but it´s an cylindical neodym magnet coated in medical silicone so i don´t expect the coating to be damaged or should i? Any ideas or experiences for magnetizing?

  • From what I've read so far silicone coating has a low rate of failure, but that doesn't mean it doesn't. Given the symptoms I second what everyone's been saying: take it out and find out. At worst it's just be nothing and you'll just need to implant it / another one again (and we'll need to find an explanation for the loss in magnetism).

  • Unless you've been through an MRI or something out of the ordinary that could cause it to lose magnetism, pretty much the most likely scenario would be that the coating failed and it is breaking down. Depending on who made the magnet, there are different types of silicone and some will break down faster than others. But all silicone will degrade over time in the body, and every magnet coated in silicone should not be regarded as permanent.
    As of right now nobody has successfully remagnetized an implanted magnet. It takes an extremely strong electromagnet to remagnetize magnets in general, so doing it in the body is a whole other level of tricky.
    So really your first option is to leave a magnet in that has weakened, doesnt work well anymore, and very likely is corroding and leaching heavy metals into your body. Or, it might be best to remove it and check it out, and if it is bad you can get a new one.
  • edited November 15

    Hmm the same has happened with my 1st gen m31s in my right fingers. Maybe I'll cut one out this friday, after some whiskey. Good to give it at least the weekend to heal before I go bashing it into a WWII era lathe again. >_<

  • @Ebrithil said:
    Was your M31 magnet gold coated?

    Titanium Nitride, as it were. The concept is perfect but actually getting a reliable coat of TiN on the magnets without ruining the strength of the neodymium has been proven too much of a hassle it seems. As I understand it the entire idea has since been sank.

    Speaking of, has anyone looked into how this coating is applied?:
    http://neoption.com/neoption-about/

    Just getting a reliable coating of titanium on a magnet would be a chore, but if it could be done and this coating applied that apparently makes the body think it's a scaffold to adhere to, implant success would dramatically increase or at the very least be encouraging to new users. Thoughts?

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