My 6 Month Experience with Implants
  • McSTUFFMcSTUFF January 2015
    Left hand in order of installation:
          • Haworth magnet
          • xNTi tag
          • M31 magnet

    image

    I live in a liberal part of America. People here are accepting and curious of new ideas rather than automatically repulsed. My mother and brother were fascinated with why I would want magnets in my body and I happily explained. After the shock wore off they didn't feel differently.

    Where I live the scene is predominantly catholic and Lutheran. I myself am a practicing catholic but I haven't mentioned this to any church scholars. My hand has never burst into flames at church or when contacting the Eucharist or holy water so I can verify that these devices are not, in fact, evil. You're welcome.

    My coworkers are all excited, curious or confused by my implants. No one has given me any "number of the beast" arguments. My coworkers range from a 23 year old female engineer to a 55 year old PE (Professional Engineer). My young coworker likes when I demonstrate to the sales guys how I can lift a magnetic pen off the table. My boss, the 55yo, asked if I saw any implants at CES (Consumer Electronics Show) and I showed him the only one I know. Me.

    Here's a video of me at CES. I show up just after 2:00.

    To anyone who's nervous about being ostracized, talk to the people around you. Show them examples of cyborgs and gauge their reactions. You might be surprised that people are not all insane about implants. If they are, just don't tell them you have them or are considering getting one. Unless you want to start an argument in which case you were warned.

    As someone who passed out for all three implants I guess I started off on the wrong foot each time but they have worked out very well for me in the long run. If you are considering getting your first implant I highly encourage you to go for it.
  • Do you happen to remember the pain associated with the implants? I'm really considering the magnet to feel fields but I'm very hesitant on cutting up my fingertips. I'm not a huge fan of needles or objects cutting me. But am way to eager to get the new tech/something interesting. Do you think that the implant in the hand on the palm either upper or lower be as sensitive as the fingertips at feeling fields?

    I know that's a lot of questions sorry about that ;) I should probably just suck it up and get my self drugged lol.
  • McSTUFFMcSTUFF June 2015
    I've had piercings and donated blood and this was higher on the pain scale. Pain has never made me pass out but knowing my body was damaged was a huge shock to the system. Using lidocaine for pain is a smart choice. I KNOW that I couldn't perform this procedure on my myself so I have gone to piercing artists every time and their skill has been invaluable. None of my implants have rejected and I'm preparing for another RFID tag soon.

    From what I have read and understood fingertips will give you the greatest amount of sensitivity. This is great news when you are sensing fields in a few months but bad news for the installation. 
  • I only have gotten tattoos no peircings so the whole thing will be new to me. I was figuring that it would be the best spot but hoping not at the same time haha.
  • ightdenightden June 2015
    Just find someone with experience who you trust and who's willing to use lidocaine and you wont feel a thing! 
  • I'm working on that part in trying to bribe my sister (tattoo artist) haha
  • spiltwinespiltwine July 2015
    I would describe the pain of implanting a magnet with a big needle (10 gauge), as similar to biting my tongue or stubbing my toe.

    After the needle is out out and the magnet is in, the pain recedes, much like either of the aforementioned injuries.

    I used ibuprofen beforehand, and then a few hours afterwards, and aside from contact tenderness, it wasn't a big thing.