Prevent scurvy, increase regeneration of skin and increase overall bodily health through goats
  • MaelMael March 29
    Currently quite busy at my college atm and am making my first post while i can in order to spark discussion on this.
    I recently learned that goats have a gene in their liver that enables them to produce vitamin c independantly and im thinking that perhaps using that gene (which is shown to work in animals) in either bacteria to easily produce vitamin c or, using crispr to edit human cells to produce it might be a good test to run to see if by providing a source of vitamin c creation in the body, one may have the ability to heal collegen and other tissue through there body itself
    P.s. posting via phone sorry for poor grammar and inconsitentcy
  • CassoxCassox March 29
    It's not just goats man. Any obligate carnivore also produces vitamin c. Cats for example...
  • MaelMael March 30
    Really? huh i never knew...
    do you think it would be a good gene "tweak if you will"? i mean ascorbic acid/vitamin c is extremely hard to absorb in excess so having the ability in body to make it, in order to have a constant supply seem's like a pretty mild genetic tweak that one could probably safely test using rna methods on skin cell's or even actual people if im being honest, though i wouldn't exactly want to experiment on people first..
  • _Larry__Larry_ March 30
    My concerns would be excess amounts of vitamin c. Megadoses can cause side effects like diarrhea and nausea. Adding a constant supply of a vitamin our body should be getting sufficient amounts from our diet could cause problems. Only way I could see this being a good idea is if you were going full carnivore and wanted to be able to get vitamin c from the protein you consume.
  • CassoxCassox March 30
    Vitamin c is water soluble. Usually the problem with megadoses is local. Either it's so acidic you get mouth sores or you fuck up your gi tract. I don't personally see a downside yet. The real problem is.. how?
  • CassoxCassox March 30
    I always have big plans but either no money or no time. I've been intending to do a big food project. Basically, a write up of all the essential and non essential nutrients etc.. what happens if we high dose or low dose each..

    There's a lot of untapped potential.
  • Something I am currently actively looking into (may become focus of my research this summer) is modifying our microbiome to work better for us.  For example having e. coli produce vitamins such as vitamin c, d, etc., creatine, maybe resveratrol, astaxanthin, dopamine, and more.


    @Cassox , I would like to see that write up (I understand it might be a while).  It would be pretty cool to see nutrients marked against each other and see their dose dependent effects.  If you wanted help on it I would be willing to help some.
  • MaelMael March 30
    @Cassox im deffinately interested in that write up as well, for whenever you get around to it and whenever you finish it. there's definitely potential for both vit-c and a lot more essential nutrient's that could definately be looked into, though i do understand you have plan's and no time, and i realise that this would be a long way down the line, however do you think temporary editing the gene (through rna i believe?) into our liver cell's would allow them to produce the vitamin c for the rest of the body or would it have to be a more localized tweak?
    @RealityWizard , thats actually a damn good idea, i hope that your future research is successful, and im especially interested in the e, coli being able to produce all that, i mean it pretty much negates having to eat certain food group's, as well as allowing one to function healthier and better