Significance of Rabbit Brain Reanimation in Aldehyde-Stabilized Cryopreservation
  • decaldecal January 14
    ATTN Cryobiologists:

    Care to explain why the rabbit brain reanimination in the Cryobiology journal article entitled "Aldehyde-stabilized cryopreservation" received the media attention it did in early 2016?  Is it simply because of the new freezing technique?  From what I could gather, the organ never actually perished (in the sense that function discontinued at room temperature for an inordinate amount of time.)  In the case that the breakthrough is in the new freezing approach--well, that also seems like a bit of bad news since it implies that anyone who's been cryogenically preserved up until this discovery now has a brain considered to be in ruin.  

    Am I interpreting this research correctly?


  • CathasachCathasach January 14
    It seems mostly to be a matter of improving research techniques for neurobiological research more than something that could be used for cryogenics.

    "that also seems like a bit of bad news since it implies that anyone who's been cryogenically preserved up until this discovery now has a brain considered to be in ruin."

    I think some sort of brain damage was probably inevitable from the current techniques.
  • chironexchironex January 15
    K they can't reanimate shit. All the new technique does is let you thaw it out so you can look at the structure without it turning to goo. It's exciting in that normally brains turn to goo if you freeze them, then thaw them out. So yes anyone stupid enough to do cryonics currently will be goo when they're thawed. it's entirely a marketing ploy. And this only preserves structure. There's more to the brain than the vague shape. So you'd still be missing stuff and you still can't reanimate things.