• JSpiggleJSpiggle July 2016
    Im assuming you guys would be all over this already but just in case you aren't... this just popped up on my facebook feed (in a blacksmithing group no less!), what do you guys think? http://futurism.com/physicists-combine-gold-with-titanium-and-quadruple-its-strength/ . Im going to go out on a limb here and say that billet at the top of the article is not really titanium-3 so it may be while before we even get a usable amount but it seems interesting none the less.
  • Dragon5Dragon5 July 2016
    yeah just saw that on reddit and thought it would be a cool idea for a coating...
  • kuroro86kuroro86 July 2016
    The full name is : Ti 3Au this is important because it need 3 part of gold for every titanium you want to use. And this could make it expensive. Here the link to the original article : http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/7/e1600319.full 

    Have fun 
  • ZerbulaZerbula July 2016
    The coating is only microns thick, however. We aren't talking about... Even maybe $.50 USD in gold, are we? :o

    Pure Au plated magnets, as they are, are dirt cheap compared to TiN... It's not so much the material itself rather than the process and tolerances of it, methinks.

    Unless copious amounts of Au need to be destroyed to manufacture Ti3Au... :s


    @Kuroro86 that link isn't working for me >~<<br />
  • kuroro86kuroro86 July 2016
    So hee two new link : 

    http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/7/e1600319.full

    http://news.rice.edu/2016/07/20/titanium-gold-new-gold-standard-for-artificial-joints-2/?platform=hootsuite

    @Zerbula in gold you meant $0.50 or $50 ?
     Keep in mind that you have to use 3 times the amount of gold than titanium. Just for the recipe. Than there is the process. And keep in mind this is pure gold and is expensive. If you want a small implant like a magnet no problem , but think bigger a portion of skull , the knee or the bones of a leg or arm we are seeing cost rise. 


  • ZerbulaZerbula July 2016
    I mean 50 cents, and even that is probably an exaggeration. Again, it depends on what surface you're coating, I agree.

    Titanium, being even cheaper than gold, shouldn't be that messy with cost. Diluting out a layer of Au to 75% on a magnet should in theory be even less expensive as far as materials go than Au coated magnets are now, removing the processing difficulties.

    Go look up sites like K&J Magnetcs, Gauss Boys, etc. I've seen a few 24 carat Au plated n52 in assorted shapes and sizes for less than 50 cents.

  • JoshJosh July 2016
    Not like it makes a huge difference in terms of pricing, but isn't Ti3Au 3 parts Titanium for each part Gold (just like H2O is 2 parts Hydrogen for each part Oxygen)?  Either way, with the amount of Gold and Titanium being used for each magnet the cost for materials is almost nothing.  The real issue is applying the coating to magnets and the failure rates.  I have no experience with coating magnets, but this looks very promising!