Revisiting microdermal piercings as electrodes
  • garethnelsonukgarethnelsonuk November 2015
    This has been mentioned in the past - the idea of using microdermals for EEG and tDCS, and is an idea with some flaws, though an idea has occurred to me that is rather gloriously simple - essentially the primary problem with using piercings for electrical stimulation of the brain is current density - so why not simply use some hefty resistors or a CLD to drive the current way down and match the safe current level for the particular size of the microdermal piercing site?

    I often wear a small homemade CES device on the back of my head (it's went through various revisions, the oldest being in my avatar, the latest revision is based on an ATTiny85 and a coin cell battery and uses 2 TENS electrodes) and was pondering getting some microdermals installed before soldering directly to the tops and having them screwed into place so I can wear the device 24/7 and program it to activate at set times of day.

    For those who aren't up on their AVR chips, if you keep it in sleep most of the time, the ATTiny85 is insanely low power and it's feasible to run it for years on a single battery - a couple of small coin cells could be put there for something very discrete and long lasting. It also gets round the annoying issue of the TENS-style sticky pads falling off (which makes 24/7 wearing not feasible).

    Thoughts anyone?
  • ChrisBotChrisBot November 2015
    I really like this concept. It does seem quite eloquently simple to use a micro dermal. 

    Just to confirm, a CES stimulates electrical signals within the brain to help adjust mood, focus, etc..? I have heard of these devices before, but the concept of wearing one all the time intrigues me.

    What kind of effects does your CES have on you? Do you prefer to wear it all the time if you can?

    Sorry if these questions seem a bit off topic/nonconstructive. Still new here.