A rumble in the distance. Big things are coming.
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    So, I don't wanna get toooooooo excited yet, but today was a very big day. I've talked before how before this I worked on nuclear fusion. So I'm quite used to vacuum systems and everything that goes along with them. This importantly covers coating of things with other things that you can't normally coat them with. Things like titanium nitride, or diamond. I've spent the last little while rebuilding my old setup since making some of the high tech materials I need for various projects turned out to be cheaper than trying to buy them (carbon nanotubes cost 1200 for a 4cm x 4cm forest). I've been building all day and have finished the day with a functional vacuum chamber that can be switched out easily for various purposes and allow for all kind of coatings. I'm waiting on a few parts to show up to really crank it up to 11 but now I can properly start researching these materials and the benefit of it will hopefully extend to all of you. I'll be able to make high quality mirrors for lasers and various projects, hopefully the nanotubes I desperately need and i'm working on boron doped diamond for use in neural implants. I'll post some pictures and videos of ym setup later but my hands are cut, soar and bloody and frankly I can't be bothered right now. This is still just the first day but if this continues to work this well and at this pace it'll be an exciting next few months. 
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul August 2015
    Congrats on the push! Can't wait to see what you'll be able to crank out.
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    And as promised, video: link
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul August 2015
    Dude your Canadian!?!?

    Anyway that's awesome it looked like you are really ready to get going. How long do you expect the growing to take when you start it up?
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    ...yes? :P what about it?

    Diamonds grow at a few micrometers per hour so the longer you leave it the thicker the coating. Now, I don't know if it'll even work on this setup. I may need to work a diffusion pump in to get a deeper vacuum but I can still do plenty with just this. If nothing else I can easily do metal evaporation once my molybdenum foil shows up to make the carrier boats. Which means custom mirrors for lasers and telescopes. I should mention, once this is done, i'm opening it up as a service to whoever needs it. So if you need a small piece coated in aluminum for example I'd be able to do it for you for cheaper than most other companies. Same with the electrodes. I'm making them so that people here can use them. But I digress. 
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul August 2015
    That's ok I digress more....cough....go Bruins.....cough....

    That's really cool that you will be able to do that does a diamond coating equal longer lasting or just stronger and more bio friendly?
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    incredibly long lasting and durable. Very bio friendly and I can make it conductive or insulating
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul August 2015
    Could you use it to make a charging port or connector to charge an implant then? If it's as strong as diamond (cause it's diamond) and conductive as hell that would be a great way to make charging in and through skin something to be "easily done" I assume?
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    i guess but I don't see the point. A charging port doesn't need to be diamond hard since it shouldn't be wet or really in contact with the body. It's conductive but only really good at a few volts. Past that it causes isssues. Still great for electrodes for neural interfaces and biosafe coatings potentially. But not a charging port. Also good at disinfecting pools and sewage treatment since using it for electrolysis rips proteins apart which is cool. Was kicking around an idea for a synthetic stomach based on diamond. "I EAT (with) DIAMONDS"
  • Neural interfaces sound like a good path to go down, but not directly on the brain - peripheral nerve interfaces would be easier to handle both in terms of the surgery (and complications) and ease of development (it's easier to read a muscle signal and stimulate a touch receptor than to work directly with the brain).

    How feasible would it be to tap the muscle signals in an arm and translate that to commands that work separately from actual full muscle movements? I'm thinking about picking up small signals that aren't strong enough to cause an arm movement but could still be trained for input to a computer.
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    I say neural, I do mean peripheral. While it could be used on the brain, im not letting some guy in a back alley crack my head open to put it in as it were. So ya plan was to go for an arm. If you're "tapping muscles" with a surgical implant rather than a surface electrode you'll be picking up a lot more than small signals. Proper surgery would let you attach to the nerves that would've gone to the hand so you get loads of info to control whatever you want.
  • I'm used to working with EEG and EMG using electrodes on the scalp or facial muscles where everything is in the microvolt range, how much stronger would it be when connecting directly to nerves inside the body?

    There's almost certainly info about this in the medical literature for invasive BCIs such as the BrainGate but I actually looked into this a few years back and found no hard specifications.
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    I'm not sure of specifics as I haven't had a chance to read into deapth, but presumably, its significantly more
  • The problem is it's not really feasible to figure it out experimentally since you need to spec the ADC chip BEFORE you build+implant your device.

    I'll do some more hunting around myself and see if I can get voltage specs.
  • Also of relevance:

    http://www.academia.edu/359344/Decoding_Information_From_Neural_Signals_Recorded_Using_Intraneural_Electrodes_Toward_the_Development_of_a_Neurocontrolled_Hand_Prosthesis

    I doubt single nerve fibers could be tapped in DIY surgery, but we could certainly come up with something.
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    So I'm filming a video on exactly how hydrothermal carbonization works and so I'm trying something new. I'm using it to make iron oxide nanospheres, that are hollow. The same thing can also be done using silica (which is important but i'll explain another time) and other metals (cobalt nickle etc.) I'm curious to see if they would make better thermite but could also be useful as a catalyst. Also, they look super weird. Like a more vibrant red than normal iron oxide, or at least they do in the paper. We'll see how it goes. Also got more things sorted for the vacuum system so it's no more than a month away from being able to do all the cool things. Just waiting on stuff from the states and china, so really it's just shipping that's slowing this down. In the meantime just gonna keep working with hyrdothermal, which I think honestly is probably one of the most important nanotech synthesis methods I've seen to date if I'm being honest, due mostly to how well and easily it lets you make complex nano structures and how green and safe the process is. (damn that's a run on sentence) Of course got other projects in the works and I'll update them as they go. Also I've almost got all 3 chambers built, just gotta drill 2 more holes and epoxy some stuff and the vacuum metalizing one will be done. Pics as soon as everything is built. 
  • TheGreyKnightTheGreyKnight August 2015
    Before you try making thermite with it, Allow my to warn you. It's not going to catch on fire; It's going to explode. So, if you REALLY want to play with nano-thermite, play with tiny quantities. That said, keep it (nano-iron oxide) away from your other nanometals.
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    Just gave a quick look into it. Ya I see what you meant. Thermite that can be lit with a match? that's scary. I only used 5 ml of iron solution to start so I won't have very much of the stuff and it shrinks when you remove the chewy carbon center so it'll be even less. Unfortunately, you warning me that's it dangerous, just means I'll need to film it when I make some, rather than scare me off making it XD. Which means I now need to figure out how to make aluminium nanopartivcles and we're set! Anyone who says science is boring is a tool lol
  • AlexSmithAlexSmith August 2015
    For the coating of things, what temperatures do components need to withstand during the coating process?
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    Depends which process. What do you want to coat your piece with?
  • AlexSmithAlexSmith August 2015
    Diamond or sapphire or TiN
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    Diamond isn't that hot, TiN gets toasty enough to mess up a magnet but I'm not sure how hot excatly and sapphire is the same temp as TiN. I've got a thermocouple specifically to test things like that so as soon as it's good to go i'll let you know how hot it gets in there. I know that tape on the back of items survives the process just fine and so do many plastics. Are you coating glass? or a metal or what? if it's a sensitive subject pm me

  • TheGreyKnightTheGreyKnight August 2015
    Sapphire sits up there with Silicon in terms of melting temp. Thousands of degrees. (I was sort of trying to manufacture synthetic sapphire for a laser at one point, but gave up when I couldn't make a 2K Fahrenheit flame.)
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    We'll see how things go and if I can coat plastic or not, it may just burn. if it does then no plastics in the sputter chamber but I can still metalize plastic with aluminum or gold or maybe copper. And although gold isn't the best coating wise, it'd be a lot better than electrolytic gold coatings 
  • TheGreyKnightTheGreyKnight August 2015
    Heh... Well, I'm not really certain then. In my experience, limited though it is, Oxides tend to need higher temperatures across the board.
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    Oh you don't actually start with the oxide. If you want the oxide you fill the chamber with oxygen and the oxides form on their way to the target. Same with nitrides. Not sure about carbides, maybe methane for that. Diamond is hydrogen bubbled through a hydrocarbon. You actually make most of the materials mid air as it were. Or rather you adjust teh amount of oxygen and argon and nitrogen in the chamber but ya that's the basics
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    Made some of the iron oxide nanospheres that are hollow on the inside. Made a full video showing exactly how I made them. It's just rendering and will be up by tomorrow morning. It's kind've cool, it looks just like really high quality iron oxide which most methods I've seen to make regular iron oxide look like a nasty brown and is usually impure. So it's cool that this method could be used to make nice pure iron oxide, but the particles being so strange makes it even better. Had a few mishaps while making them (things accidentally exploded a little, remarkably a ceramic dish doesn't like being quickly heated to 100 degrees) So i ended up losing a lot of powder so i'll have to redo the whole process but once I make enough i'll try making some thermite out of the stuff. Using the same process i'll try and make the silica particles soon which are basically aerogel and those will be used to house proteins and stuff on the inside of a protocell (maybe). So ya was a productive day and video will be up tomorrow
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul August 2015
    Can't wait to see it and thermite... sounds like your gonna have some fun.
  • chironexchironex August 2015
    Link to the new video: link
  • ShineShine August 2015
    Could this method be used to put a bioproof coating on an RFID chip?
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    Maybe. I'll try it in a few days and we'll see if the chip can still receive signal through the metal layer. If not you'll need a silicon or polymer coating, I suggest pdms. I'll be looking into pdms and soft lithography but with school and the 80000000 things i need to do already it'll be a bit till I can add polymer coatings to my list of services, while metal and TiN will be very soon.
  • ShineShine September 2015
    Earlier in this thread you were talking about diamond coating? What does that involve?
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    That's an even more agressive and hot process but I could also try that. still waiting on the tungsten wire though so until that shows up i can't. Normally it's done on metal or glass but i'll certainly try it on plastics and see if it just melts them.
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    new blog post: link

    Turns out the reactor was acting as a catalyst for the carbon capped particles. So when i switched to a teflon reactor it stopped working. Finally got a good batch to work today now that i'm adding catalyst in manually. Also I didn't put it on the blog but i'm looking into coating the particles in silica. For those who are gentically minded may know that silica beads can be used to extract dna from tissue very easily and cheaply. Currently it's the standard. The other method is to chemically attach dna to iron nanoparticles and then suck it out of solution with a magnet. I thought i could do better and after discussion with my genetics proff i'm gonna see if i can do just that this weekend and over the next week or two. If that all goes well he's letting me try it out in his lab. I'm excited to say the least. And now that im making particles again i have feedstock for the fluorescent ones so i can get some research samples of that as well. And finally every bodies favorite, graphene. Turns out i can make it using hydrothermal synthesis. gonna try it out this weekend as well and i'll let ya know how it goes, if it goes well i'll make a video.

    edit: forgot to mention, chamber 1 imploded and now has to be rebuilt (that was the diamond one). Vacuum system is still fine and i ducked before it got me. Still working on the sputtering but it's giving me issues and may send out for a 3d printed steel part cause i lack a welder atm.
  • ElectricFeelElectricFeel September 2015
    How did you implode a chamber?
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    It was the first chamber i'd made so it was of lower quality. There was a slight crack in the top that had been hidden by the epoxy i'd used to hold  the gas inlet on. I accidentally touched an elelctrode to ti and the heat of the arc on the inside of the chamber made the crack lengthen. I saw it happen and dove out of the way before the implosion. I'm still finding glass in the lab. It was a stupid mistake
    but now i've learned and have an excuse to make it better next time
  • TheGreyKnightTheGreyKnight September 2015
    When you said there was a rumble in the distance, I didn't expect it to be as loud as an imploding vacuum chamber. How did you cut the hole for the gas inlet? And how thick was the glass? 

    Also, as a rule, I generally wear protective gear comparable to a lower-end blast suit whenever I work with anything that can explode. Doubled denim does a fair job of catching shrapnel and embers. If you can get one, a winter-weight military jacket (Not a coat) does an incredible job of shedding embers and keeping heat in, and out. It's also pretty resistant to chemicals. I haven't tested it's resistance to shrapnel yet, though. 

    It'll be more expensive, but have you considered using laminated glass, or draping the chamber with welding backdrops? 

    Finally, what kind of steel part do you need for sputtering? Also, any chance you could do a quick video on the specs and construction of your reactors?
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    The exploding reactor actually gives me a great chance to show how I make them. I use a dremel and diamond bit to cut the glass. the trick is to use a bit of modeling clay or plastacine to make a little pool of water around where you're cutting. Keeps the glass cool and you cut much faster. I keep a pippette full of water next to me and am constantly dousing it with water as I cut once there's a hole through since the water just drains away. Glass is a about a quarter to 3/8ths thick. It's a regular glass jar. I have a big stainless steel vacuum chamebr i've been eyeing but i'll only move to that once I have a functional system. i need to know the parts can take the abuse before I got and work a 400 dollar chamber.  Honestly the glass doesn't have very much mass and becuase it's an IMplosion a lot of the energy is lost before it can get to you, so long as you're not sitting right next to it. I am working on installing a blast shield though just in case. It's too damn hot in my house for that sort of coatage but in winter i'll be wearing something heavier. Im always wearing pants and a lab coat though so that helps. 

    The steel piece is what holds the magnet, the material you're gonna sputter and acts as the main electrode. It's intrinsically easy to make but i was using epoxy to hold the pieces together which is less than idea since it gets really hot, even with water cooling. I had about a liter of ice water being pumped through the thing and the whole litre was luke warm within a minute or two of running the thing. I had a nice 3d model of the part but my computer crashed before i saved so i only have an older version of the part. It'd still give you an idea of what it'll look like if you're interested but i haven't had time to sit down and re-do it so it's not accurate to what the final thing need to look like. Also 3d printing is expensive whereas if i could weld the bits quickly myself it'd be far cheaper. Theres an autoshop down the road, may ask them to weld it for me.

    Also, if you see me running, i suggest you follow suit. My work has a habbit of becoming energetic XD. So if i say rumble, assume something big is actually coming. 
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    Well it's been a productive day and the day isn't over yet. I just did a thing that could actually make a big impact. DNA extraction is usually done through a couple techniques but they all have their drawbacks. One of the main ones used now is the use of silica beads. DNA will bind to the beads under high salt conditions while other cell fragments pass right through. By then adding some clean solvent the DNA lets go and you've got your sample. This has a few problems that I won't get into now. The other method is to chemically modify the DNA straight out of the cells and then use iron nanoparticles to chemically grab the DNA, then using an electromagnet you pull it out of solution. rinse the plate then release the magnet and you've got clean DNA. Big problem with this one is the chemical modification. 

    What i've done is hopefully fuse the two. I used the carbon capped particles i've been working on and have successfully coated them in silica. Going to eb going in to one of my professors labs to try them out. I'll keep you updated. 

    Other house keeping things, the youtube channel is gonna get moved around. I think for the sake of numbers i'll be moving the videos on to my old channel (that has 16000 subs, vs the current one which has 300). Same content but different location so for those interested in following my work you'll have to sub the other channel for updates. Gonna spend the night overhauling the old channel to make it hospitable for biohacking stuff. Not a real change, just a beurocratic one that needs to be done. I'll give more details on this tomorrow once the move is done and stuff but just a heads up.
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    Updated my implant video and moved it to the correct channel: link

    also at the end I showed the silica particles quickly for those interested.
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    Just talked to my professor. On Friday I'll be going in for the first time to try out the silica magnetic particles to try and extract DNA.He's very interested in my nanoparticle work and im sure I can grab his attention with biohacking projects as well. He's giving me essentially free reign of his lab and is head of the bio department so could mean access to all kinds of fun toys. I'll keep ya updated but this could be really exciting.
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul September 2015
    I just was checking out some of your videos very awesome stuff your doing. Keep the updates rolling. I've been reading it all as it comes out.
  • TheGreyKnightTheGreyKnight September 2015
    Say, what vacuum pressure are you using for your chambers?
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    IT WORKS!!!!!!!!!!!!! wabalubadubdub!!! Spent the morning in my proffs lab using the silica particles to pass DNA from one vial to the next. It loses a bit on the way but it still works well for a first go. Still lots to refine and i'll need to see if the particles are working because of the silica or because of something else. I also need to adjust the particles and stuff. But point it, I could be well on my way to a new method to extract DNA.

    @thegreyknight usually about 10^-3 to 10^-5 torr. Depending on what I'm doing and if I'm using a diffusion pump or not, which currently I'm not. So usually 10^-3, although deeper is almost always better
  • TheGreyKnightTheGreyKnight September 2015
    Will a refrigerator pump do the job? Or am I going to need a real vacuum pump?
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul September 2015
    Sorry @chironex but I can't resist this.....that's what she said........

    Anyway have you documented it? And would this be the first time it's been done? I can only imagine what this could be used for outside of biohacking if it turns out to be "better" then either one of the other methods.
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    You need a real one. Fridge won't work I tried trust me. A decent one is like 50 bucks? not bad really.

    There's 1 other product i've seen that's similar but mine is made through a completely green method and is a bit different. Ya if it works well it could well replace the kits many people use. I document constantly and am currently looking into a patent on it and once I have it I'll show exactly how it works. It's pretty simple though. Which is what makes it nice. We used stuff every lab has and it worked well. No special tech needed at all.
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul September 2015
    So crazy thought what would be required, bare minimum, to identify the species of the sample? Device wise is what I'm looking for with the assumption you already have the profile of that species on record.
  • chironexchironex September 2015
    What species? You mean the DNA I used? I used whatever the grad students didn't need XD TOPO DNA. it's a plasmid about 29kbp long. That and the silica nanoparticles is pretty much all you need except some buffer and a salt. I'm working out which salt works best and how to make the particles better so they pick up and release DNA on command efficiently. If you're using them to identify a species you'd break open some cells, drop these in with the salt and then use a magnet to pick them up, move them to a new well and add the release solution. They'd let go of the DNA which you can then purify and analyze using pcr or mass sequencing or something.
  • MeanderpaulMeanderpaul September 2015
    I was talking about using your system in conjunction with a device to determine a species instead of just showing DNA is there.

    My thought is can it be used by a game warden with a device to identify a species of animal be it human, deer, or what ever.

    Am I just daydreaming or do you think that it could be possible to do? I'm not to sure about DNA so I'm sorry if it's an odd question.